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Posted On: 14/05/2011 | Asked By: Joe Palmiotti | Boat: Pokey | Category: Sail Boats
Question:
Hi,

My jib sheets are chafing the fiberglass between the fairlead block and the winch on my Ranger 26. I recently saw a metal style tape in a catalog, or on line that was designed to eliminate this problem, but I cannot remember the name of the product or where it was offered. I would appreciate any information you can provide.

Thanks, Joe
Answer:
"

Hi Joe,


There are a lot of metal (foil) tapes but the ones I'm familiar with are made by 3M.  I know what you are talking about with the jib chafe and the foil tape is a good solution.  It will protect the fiberglass and the tape is UV resistant and waterproof.  3M makes three different products (different thickness/different adhesives) and I've included a link below to the data sheets for each of the products.


1.  3M Product #1449 is my choice because it is the thinnest of the foil tapes at 1.4 mil and that makes it easy to shape.  It has a strong adhesive and a long service life, plus it is waterproof and UV and mold resistant.  Click HERE for 3M foil tape website then click 3311.


2.  3M Product #3326 has the strongest adhesive and is the thickest of the three products at 2.3 mil, but it will withstand a lot of abuse.  So, if you chafe problem is really bad, this is your product.  Click on the link above and then on 3326 for the product sheet.


3.  3M Product #3311 is in between in thickness at 2 mil and it has a strong adhesive, but can still be removed.  It has the added advantage of a paper liner which makes it each to cut and shape if that's important.


In addition to 3M Intertape makes a line of Aluminum foil tapes that are rated for marine use.  I have no experience with these tapes, but they are marine rated, so I'm sure they will do the trick as well.  Click HERE for the Intertape website.


Hope this helps.


Good luck,


Captain Mike Clayton

"
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Posted On: 25/03/2011 | Asked By: Terri Rosalind Hertzberg | Boat: MORGANCE | Category: Sail Boats
Question:
Hi,

I'm looking for recommendations for an oil change pump. I've had it with what I have been using and need something that will just plane WORK. Any suggestions.

Terri
s/v MORGANCE
Answer:
"

Hi Terri

I've not had a lot of experience with oil exchange pumps myself so my advice may be of limited help, but I have used a Reverso pump system on the Swans that I've run in the past. http://reversopumps.com/products.htm

These pumps have also given me some trouble but I believe primarily due to the fact that the retro fit installation was a little poor. It is really important to install the pump as low down as possible, below the level of the engine sumps to enable the pumps to prime easily. Regardless of whether or not they say they are self priming, moving the pump lower in the bilge in my case made a huge difference.  If the pump runs dry for a long time whilst priming, the rubber impeller will suffer and quickly fail, moving the pump below the sump level will minimize the length of time to prime the pump. Also to assist the prime, you should heat the oil up before draining to lower the viscosity. Run the engine for 5-10 mins, no need to bring it up to running temperature but just a little warm to aid the flow.

Sorry I can't recommend a number of other pumps as I just don't have the experience of anything other than Reverso, but the above suggestions made a big difference for me.

Best of luck

Captain Ian Fagg

"
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Posted On: 17/03/2011 | Asked By: Phyllis C. Sines | Boat: La Casa Del Mar | Category: Power Boats
Question:
Hello,

A friend asked me about being out in a lightning storm in a small aluminum fishing boat. How do you protect yourself?

The boat is grounded because it is aluminum but what will happen if it is struck my lightening? My first thought is not be on the water during a storm but sometimes you might be caught out.

Thanks,

Phyllis
Answer:
"

Hi Phyllis,


Your first thought of not being on the water during lightning is the best; a lightning strike is very bad news and I've been struck in a carbon fiber yacht, so I know from which I speak.


First, lightning always takes the path of least resistance to ground. In some circumstances, being in a metal boat can be a great advantage in a lightning storm. If you have a tall metal (aluminum) mast to act as a lightning conductor and a metal hull, the lightning will travel down your mast, around the hull and to the water (ground). According to the "Faraday's Cage" principle, if you are inside the cabin and not touching the aluminum hull or deck, i.e. sitting on the wooden interior, the current will pass around the hull to the water and you will remain perfectly safe. In the case of a fiberglass boat, the rig should always be grounded to the keel with heavy gauge wire, to give lightning a path to ground should the boat be struck.  Often the guard rails will be grounded too, as these also act as good conductors. But again, inside on a wooden bench you should be safe.


In the case of your friend's 19-foot fishing boat, if it has a cabin then inside there would be the safest place to be, BUT not in direct contact with the hull or any other metal component. For example, make sure you are sitting on a wooden bench or a plastic ice box.  If the boat in question is a simple bare aluminum hulled "open" style boat, unfortunately your chances of escaping injury are greatly reduced in the event of a direct hit. The reason is in a 19-foot boat you are at best 9.5 feet away from the point of contact, and if your are sitting on an aluminum bench seat, you are now part of the path to ground. Not good!


If you do find yourself caught out in an electrical storm, your best bet is to head for home as quickly as possible, or if possible get close to a land mass with higher elevation, or better yet high buildings/structures on that land mass. As a last resort, make sure you have a molded plastic ice chest to serve as a non-metallic seat.


Hope this helps.


Best regards,


Captain Ian Fagg

"
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Posted On: 05/03/2011 | Asked By: Deborah D. O'Connor | Boat: | Category: Sail Boats
Question:
My Ranger 29 needs paint on the decks too, but is the Easypoxy for on decks and cabintop topsides or topside shipside, that is, is it good for traction underfoot or shiney-esque in nature? How about a paint for the non-skid design areas (pattern molded-in)? Thanks much.
Answer:
"

He Debra,


As Craig Bliss answered to an earlier question, Petit Easypoxy is very easy to use and gives great results whether rolled and tipped, or brushed.  It is approved for both topsides and decks and here's an excerpt from the manufacturer's product information:


"Easypoxy is a modern polyurethane topside and deck enamel improved by the addition of silicone for brilliant shine and easy brushability. It has ultraviolet filters which enhance the already superior gloss retention and durability of polyurethane. The result is a topside finish that's exceptionally easy to apply, producing a lasting gelcoat-like brilliance with a minimum of effort.  For a semi-gloss finish for decks and interiors use 3106 Easypoxy Semi-Gloss White or simply add 9080 Easypoxy Satin Additive to any Easypoxy color for a custom satin look."


Click HERE for a direct link to the manufacturer's website for this particular product.


For the molded in non-skid area, there are special directions on the website for painting these areas and here is another quote from the manufacturer:


"For decks which have a pre-molded, non-skid embossment, wash the surface with 15095 Fiberglass Dewaxer. Abrade area thoroughly with bronze wool; solvent clean to remove residue. Apply two coats of Easypoxy, adding 9900 Skidless Compound to the mixture if an improved non-skid texture is desired."


This product should work well for you for both the topsides and the decks.


Happy painting,


Captain Mike Clayton


 



"
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Posted On: 27/02/2011 | Asked By: Steve Bryant | Boat: Ceres | Category: Sail Boats
Question:
Hello,

The following is the "answer" that was given to a question posted on another boating website that I visit from time to time as they do give some good advice. I am trying to understand the answer that was posted as it might have some value; but, I can't seem to make sense of it. The following is the quoted answer:

Anchoring And Raising Another's Anchor Chain posted on September 1st, 2009 Sailor (anonymous) says:

"When you sail in the Greek Islands and in the Mediterranean, you will mostly dock stern to with your anchors 150ft straight away. As the lateral distance between the centers of the docked boats is roughly 15-18ft you are very happy when you set your anchor 150ft away without crossing another's anchor chain.

Be sure when a new boat comes in, make sure that ALL the neighborhood captains are on the foredeck to tell the newcomer WHERE their chain is laying.

To prevent those problems, when raising my anchor I ALWAYS have on the foredeck a 20ft rope with a steel hook on one end. If another's chain is hooked by yours . . . raise it at the maximum (I always rent boats with an electric windlass), grab your hook on the bar (if you have a plow-type) or trip shackle of your anchor, attach it to your boat and lower your chain. Your anchor will pivot down to free the other's chain, you raise it and store... AND YOU GO.... with the other captains applauding you rather than ... $*&!($&!$"

Please explain the above if possible.

Thanks,
Steve

Answer:
"

Hi Steve

A little confusing I agree, but I get the gist and will try and explain.

Basically the author is explaining how to avoid and or deal with a situation when the anchor chains of 2 (or more) boats become crossed when docking stern to a quay, a very typical docking method in the Med. The crew determine where on the quay they wish to tie (stern to) and whilst backing towards this spot, drop their anchor and continue playing it out until they reach the quay. After tying the stern of the boat to the quay, they take up some tension on the anchor chain to keep the boat from hitting the quay as it moves around in the wind.

The problem comes when many boats are all tied in this manner to the same quay, an extremely common occurrence especially in season in popular harbours. The dock master will squash as many boats as possible onto the quay such that the boats will be pressed beam to beam like sardines in a tin. Now, assuming you manage to drop your anchor in a perfect line in front of your boat, as well as the guys either side of you and perhaps even the guys outside of them then you have no problem, but this is rarely the case. Often you may be docking with a side wind making this manoeuvre a little tricky and inevitably you may well misjudge and drop your anchor a little to windward of your space on the quay such that when you play it out and tie up, you have laid it over the top of someone else’s chain (probably the guy you are now alongside). Alternatively the same may happen when another boat docks next to you. This happens so often that it is more or less normal and is no reason to get angry (as many do), just be aware of how to deal with it.

The problem comes when you now wish to leave the dock before someone next to you who has his chain laid over the top of yours. Knowing the situation it’s probably worth letting your neighbour know you’re leaving so he can help as necessary. As you leave the quay lifting your chain, your chain will slip from underneath your neighbours, ultimately however, your anchor will hook your neighbours’ chain and as you continue to lift his chain comes up too.

So…. Now you have your anchor at the surface and the chain of your neighbour laying over it preventing you from being able to bring it aboard and stow. Your neighbour should also be aware that this might have tripped his anchor such that it’s no longer holding and preventing him from drifting back into the quay. Your neighbour should start his engine and put it in forward gear at low revs to prevent this from happening, he should then reset his anchor after you have left.

To remove the chain from your anchor, the previous author is suggesting taking a hook on a rope to hook the chain, once hooked the hook/rope assembly can be tied off tightly to a bow cleat. Lower your anchor to free it and then lift it again past the suspended chain and stow it. Now you can drop the suspended chain.


However, I personally would recommend a slightly different approach that I have successfully used, as I can’t see how you now get your hook un-hooked from your neighbor's chain. Alternatively, I take a short rope, tie one end to a bow cleat, pass it under the fouled chain, then pull it tight and tie it back to the same cleat. Now I lower my anchor to free it from the neighbor's chain and once clear lift it aboard and stow it. You may want to use your boat hook to orientate your anchor to not hook the suspended chain as it passes again on its way up.

Once your anchor is safely stowed, undo one end of the rope suspending your neighbours’ chain and let it slide away, finally pull aboard the rope AND OFF YOU GO…….

I have used this method hundreds of times for all sorts of fouled lines and chains on my anchor, including once a 4” power cable which was so heavy I could only get it to about 20 foot of the surface. On this occasion I took a longer line, tied off one end and swam with the other underneath the cable and back to the surface before tying it off to the cleat.

I hope this all makes sense.

Best regards

Capt. Ian G. Fagg

"
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Posted On: 17/02/2011 | Asked By: Joe Palmiotti | Boat: Pokey | Category: Sail Boats
Question:
I have a Ranger 26 that was built in 1974. The decks and cabin are in need of a painting. I would like to take time tihis spring to start this project. I have looked at Pettit 1 part epoxy so that I can stop and start as time and weather allows with out issues of mixing 2 part numerous times. I have read that roll and tip can produce excellent results. There looks like many parts of my deck will not allow rolling so I guess that will be all brush work. Has any one used this type of paint and what were the results.
Answer:
"

Hi Joe,


It sounds like you are referring to "Easypoxy," which I have used with great results for years. I have rolled and tipped the topsides of a 90+' boat several times, brushed small bits of hardware and everything in between. I personally love the stuff and find it very easy to work with, if you are working within the temperature perimeters and have prepped the area properly, it flows nicely without any thinners. You may need some brushing thinners depending on the environment, but use as little as possible, the less you put in the longer the paint will last.

Hope this helps, and let us know if you have any more questions on the matter.

Best,


Captain Craig Bliss

"
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Posted On: 05/02/2011 | Asked By: Vance C. Stallings | Boat: none | Category: Power Boats
Question:
Hello,

I am looking for a Lithium Hypochlorite to clean mildewed window screens with. Any products you guys know of that contain this?

Thanks,
Vance
Answer:
"

Hi Vance,


I've used with good success a product called Aqua Chem Shock Treatment for pools.  It comes in powder form to be diluted in water and contains slightly less than 30% Lithium Hypochlorite.  Works great!  Just what the doctor ordered.


Best,


Captain Craig Bliss

"
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Posted On: 05/02/2011 | Asked By: Christopher Apmann | Boat: | Category: Sail Boats
Question:
Hi Fellows,

I am looking for the specific definition of "Near Coastal" with regard to the U.S.C.G.

I am clear on the definition of Inland and International waters, but have not been able to find the exact distance for the definition of "Near Coastal". I did hear that it was 100 miles from the coast but wanted to get another opinion and maybe a 46 CFR reference.

Thanks,
Chris
Answer:
"

Hi Chris,


You must be interested in the definition as it pertains to the 6-pack license.  The definition is located in CFR 46; Section 7 and specifically in Section 10.103 and 10.109 wherein they define Near Coastal as "Ocean waters not more than 200 miles offshore."


But it is a little more complicated than that, because USCG further defines ocean waters as water seaward of the "Boundary Line."  The boundary line isn't on a chart because it isn't used for navigation, and the line is different for all coastal shores; see Section 7 for exact descriptions of various Boundary Lines.


Below I pasted in a link to the Electronic Code of Federal Regulations (e-CFR) if you are interested in reading the exact language, but as a general rule of thumb you are always going to be fine anywhere from 3 to 200 miles offshore.


Electronic Code of Federal Regulations, click HERE


Hope this helps,


Captain Craig Bliss

"
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Posted On: 03/02/2011 | Asked By: Douglas C. Ryser | Boat: Santorini II | Category: Power Boats
Question:
Hello,

I have a 1990 Bayliner 2655 Cierra with 350 Chev and Alpha 1 drive. Recently I am experiencing problem shifting out of forward or reverse to neutral. It doesn't come out of gear immediately like it use to. This causes problems in docking as you can imagine. You approach the doc and ease it into neutral and it keeps on going. You then tend to over compensate into reverse and life gets very interesting.

I have had a tech do some adjusting in the linkage down by the engine control (some kind of nut adjuster) as I was tied up to the dock. Unfortunately the problem returned.

Any ideas where to look next?

Thanks,
Doug Ryser
Answer:
"

Hi Doug,


It's pretty difficult to diagnose something like you describe from long distance, but there are only three places to look: 1. the transmission itself; 2. the mechanical linkage to the transmission shift arm; or 3. the shifter itself.


You said you had a tech adjust the linkage at the engine.  If that cured the problem temporarily and now it is back, then I would think that's the place to start again.  There are numerous ways that the mechanical linkage attaches to various shift arms and I'm not familiar with your specific Alpha 1 drive.  It either attaches to different holes in the shifter arm, or with a set of adjusting nuts that when moved in combination will adjust the linkage.  From your description, it sounds like you have the latter.  Assuming that to be the case, then there should be a set, or lock nut, behind the adjusting nuts that will keep the setting.  So, if the adjustment the tech did solved the problem for a while, then most likely the set nut has loosened and allowed the linkage to slip.


One simple test you can run is to disconnect the linkage and manually shift the transmission (while tied to the dock) using the shift lever.  If it moves easily from forward to neutral to reverse, then the problem is either the set point for the linkage, or in the shifter itself.  Assuming the transmission moves smoothly with manual shifting, then reconnect and adjust the linkage.  If it now shifts smoothly, you've isolated your problem to the linkage adjustment.  If you can't get it to shift smoothly with the linkage adjustment, then it is the shifter itself.


First thing I would do, depending on the amount of time that passed after the tech made the adjustment, is call him back and ask him to adjust it again for free.  You can also DIY by trial and error - - but remember, it doesn't take a lot of adjustment, maybe an 1/8th of an inch or so, to significantly change the mechanical advantage.


Happy shifting,


Captain Michael Clayton

"
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Posted On: 12/01/2011 | Asked By: Dwayne Melcher | Boat: Sloopy | Category: Sail Boats
Question:
Hi Guys,

I am installing an isolated starter battery as per ORC in our 42' sailboat. We got an Optima 34M [1050 CCA ] and the question came up on the sizing of the battery cables. How many amps does a Perkins 4-108 starter draw ?

The run of both the positive and ground to the engine is 15 feet. Seems everybody has different opinions between 4AWG all the way up to 00AWG. Got any opinion on welding cable ? Would you fuse it ?

Thanks
Dwayne
Answer:
"

Hi Dwayne,


I've been thinking about your problem and talking with some people in the industry, and what I've learned is the draw will vary depending on the temperature of the engine when it's cranked over.  Cold, it will draw more than if warm.  So, my best recommendation is to contact your local Perkins dealer and find out what the starter draw is, and with this value refer to the American Wire Guage Table to determine the correct guage size - - see link below:


http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm


Consulting this guide, it seems to me that a run of 15 feet is a little on the long side.  If it is possible to have a shorter run, this would definitely be preferable, but if a long run is unavoidable, then move up to the next larger size to compensate.


In my own experience, I would recommend soldering the terminals if possible, that said, there are clamp style terminals that also work well so it's a matter of preference.  You must however use a fuse, it's a small additional expense and a simple installation, but the protection is well worth it.


Best of luck with the installation,


Captain Ian Fagg

"
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Pros


Gordon Hartschuh
Lake Erie, OH
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Ian Fagg
Cornwall, England
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Bob Wellen
Annapolis, MD
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Craig Bliss
Newport, RI
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Cary Wiener
Maritime Law, Marine Insurance
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Michael Clayton
Isleboro, ME
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Jake Hill
Marine Insurance
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Eric Bell
Jamestown, RI
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